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Riatoju
08-15-2019 at 06:48 PM
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Finished reading Using 6502 Assembly Language

Finished reading Using 6502 Assembly Language and now moving onto The Stella Programmers Guide.


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  1. Snowflake's Avatar

    i'm slighlty less than 1/5 of the way through. taking my time but putting a few minutes in here and there. keep at it. also, a general life lesson is any project has mutlpile pass throughs. dont get too hung up on preparation. occasionally try to skip trhough to the end, analyze the dragster code, and when you run into trouble you know which sections in study you'll need the most

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  2. datagod's Avatar

    You have very neat hand writing.

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  3. Madsandy's Avatar

    https://www.randomterrain.com/atari-2600-memories-tutorial-andrew-davie-01.html

    A little tutorial I have found that might help you in your quest.

    Thanksdatagod thanked this post
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  4. Riatoju's Avatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Madsandy

    https://www.randomterrain.com/atari-2600-memories-tutorial-andrew-davie-01.html

    A little tutorial I have found that might help you in your quest.


    I believe that guy wrote a book on the subject. I got a copy in PDF form that I may eventually read.

  5. Kelly Kerr's Avatar

    love the handwriting.


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  6. datagod's Avatar

    That tutorial is fascinating. What I take away from it is though that I won't have the patience to manage drawing images one scanline at a time using a tiny buffer.

    On my own project (Arcade Retro Clock) I manage sprites on display matrixes of 8x8 and 16x16. I understand the concept of writing to an image buffer before pushign that out to the display. I am quite happy to rely on the underylying drivers to actually turn the led lights on in the right order.

    I greatly enjoy being able to focus on the look and feel of the clock itself, making cool games on it.


  7. francoisadt's Avatar

    All the best for having persistence learning assembly going through the theory and practical before attempting the actual coding - that is always the hard part. One do want to skip things you could have learned to provide a background learning the next logical set of instructions. Do not rely on ONE book for 6502, look at the "Internet Archive" for others that do provide another angle, tips and tricks.

    A game I would like to know the internals of is: LadyBug .. anyone ever know how the EXTRA life algorithm work?


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  8. Riatoju's Avatar

    Quote Originally Posted by francoisadt

    All the best for having persistence learning assembly going through the theory and practical before attempting the actual coding - that is always the hard part. One do want to skip things you could have learned to provide a background learning the next logical set of instructions. Do not rely on ONE book for 6502, look at the "Internet Archive" for others that do provide another angle, tips and tricks.

    A game I would like to know the internals of is: LadyBug .. anyone ever know how the EXTRA life algorithm work?



    I already knew 6502 assembly and coded a few projects in it. It's just been 7 years since I last used it so I needed to refresh. The Apple Book is probably the best I've read but I have other books and resources I use in conjunction. However this isn't my first walk in the park with Assembly or programming for that matter. I always had a natural gift. Stella intimidated me the first time I tried to learn about it. This time around I think I'm ready.

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    Updated 08-16-2019 at 11:25 AM by Riatoju
  9. Riatoju's Avatar

    Quote Originally Posted by datagod

    That tutorial is fascinating. What I take away from it is though that I won't have the patience to manage drawing images one scanline at a time using a tiny buffer.

    On my own project (Arcade Retro Clock) I manage sprites on display matrixes of 8x8 and 16x16. I understand the concept of writing to an image buffer before pushign that out to the display. I am quite happy to rely on the underylying drivers to actually turn the led lights on in the right order.

    I greatly enjoy being able to focus on the look and feel of the clock itself, making cool games on it.



    That's why you write libraries to do the work for you, or look around for other people's code to use. The only down side is keeping track of cycles and invoking the kernal in time to update the screen. Other than that it isn't that complicated once you know what you are doing, I was able to do it on the nes, but this is admittingly harder, and I like a challenge. Very few people can code assembly and very fewer can code Stella. Challenging myself will make me a better programmer.

    Updated 08-16-2019 at 11:27 AM by Riatoju
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