PlayStation 4 - Final Fantasy XV - Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout - 7.1 - Brandon Finton

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  1. PlayStation 4 - Final Fantasy XV - Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout - 7.1 - Brandon Finton

    01-15-2017, 11:41 PM
    Vzaar Video Url:


    Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout
    Score Track
    https://www.twingalaxies.com/scores.php?scores=207182
    Rules


    Game can be started from a saved file. Any gameplay changing hacks, mods, or glitches will result in disqualification of your score. The weight and length will be shown after the fish is caught.Line - any that can be obtained in the game can be usedLure - any that can be obtained in the game can be usedRod - any that can be obtained in the game can be usedReel - any that can be obtained in the game can be used

    Submission Message
    Fish hooked around 4:08.

    Thanks for watching!
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  2. 01-16-2017, 01:33 AM
    7.1 way to hook that SOB!
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  3. 01-16-2017, 07:23 AM
    That's the one that didn't get away! Is there a Final Fantasy fishing derby track in the works?
    Games lubricate the body and mind”
    ~Ben Franklin
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  4. 01-16-2017, 07:49 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by MyOwnWorstEnemy View Post
    That's the one that didn't get away! Is there a Final Fantasy fishing derby track in the works?
    Sounds like an idea. Do you have this game? I would like to hear some ideas and you can message me on Facebook if you have one. Add me!
  5. 01-16-2017, 08:40 AM
    Good catch. The rules state that any line, lure, rod, reel obtained in the game can be used but I'm wondering if the fishing equipment should be shown in the video before the catch? It seems it is shown in the video after at 5 minutes and 33 seconds though. I think your catch is fine. I'm wondering about everyone's thoughts on it.
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  6. 01-16-2017, 09:45 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyriss_Zeal View Post
    Good catch. The rules state that any line, lure, rod, reel obtained in the game can be used but I'm wondering if the fishing equipment should be shown in the video before the catch? It seems it is shown in the video after at 5 minutes and 33 seconds though. I think your catch is fine. I'm wondering about everyone's thoughts on it.
    Showing equipment is a great idea!
  7. 01-19-2017, 08:38 PM




    The
    brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is a species of freshwater fish in the salmon family Salmonidae. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada, but has been introduced elsewhere in North America and to other continents. In parts of its range, it is also known as the eastern brook trout, speckled trout, brook charr, squaretail, or mud trout, among others.[2] A potamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. The brook trout is the state fish of nine states: Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the Provincial Fish of Nova Scotia in Canada.

    Systematics and taxonomy[edit]

    The brook trout was first scientifically described as Salmo fontinalis by the naturalist Samuel Latham Mitchill in 1814. The specific epithet "fontinalis" comes from the Latin for "of a spring or fountain", in reference to the clear, cold streams and ponds in its native habitat. The species was later moved to the char genus Salvelinus. Though commonly called a trout, the brook trout is thus actually one of the chars, which in North America also include the lake trout, bull trout, Dolly Varden, and the Arctic char.
    There is little recognized systematic substructure in the brook trout, but two subspecies have been proposed. On the other hand, three ecological forms are distinguished.

    Subspecies[edit]

    The aurora trout, S. f. timagamiensis, is a subspecies native to two lakes in the Temagami District of Ontario, Canada.[3] The silver trout, (Salvelinus agassizii or S. f. agassizii), is an extinct trout species or subspecies last seen in Dublin Pond, New Hampshire, in 1930.[4] It is considered by fisheries biologist Robert J. Behnke as a highly specialized form of brook trout.[5]

    Ecological forms[edit]

    Robert J. Behnke describes three ecological forms of the brook trout.[6] A large lake form evolved in the larger lakes in the northern reaches of its range and are generally piscivorous as adults. A sea-run form that migrates into saltwater for short periods of time to feed evolved along the Atlantic coastline. Finally, a smaller generalist form that evolved in the small lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams throughout most of the original native range. This generalist form rarely attains sizes larger than 12 in (30 cm) or lives for more than three years. All three forms have the same general appearance.

    Hybrids[edit]


    Tiger trout (top 3), splake (bottom)

    The brook trout produces hybrids both with its congeners Salvelinus namaycush and Salvelinus alpinus, and intergeneric hybrids with Salmo trutta.[7][8]
    The splake is an intrageneric hybrid between the brook trout and lake trout (S. namaycush). Although uncommon in nature, they are artificially propagated in substantial numbers for stocking into brook trout or lake trout habitats.[9]Although they are fertile, back-crossing in nature is behaviorally problematic and very little natural reproduction occurs. Splake grow more quickly than brook trout and become piscivorous sooner and are more tolerant of competitors than brook trout.[10]
    The tiger trout is an intergeneric hybrid between the brook trout and the Eurasian brown trout (Salmo trutta). Tiger trout occur very rarely naturally, but are sometimes artificially propagated. Such crosses are almost always reproductively sterile. They are popular with many fish-stocking programs because they can grow quickly, and may help keep rough fish populations in check due to their highly piscivorous (fish-eating) nature.[11]
    The sparctic char is an intrageneric hybrid between the brook trout and the Arctic char (S. alpinus).[12]

    Description[edit]


    Brook trout from lake in Wyoming'sWind River Range


    Captive brook trout in an aquarium

    The brook trout has a dark green to brown color, with a distinctive marbled pattern (called vermiculation) of lighter shades across the flanks and back and extending at least to the dorsal fin, and often to the tail. A distinctive sprinkling of red dots, surrounded by blue halos, occurs along the flanks. The belly and lower fins are reddish in color, the latter with white leading edges. Often, the belly, particularly of the males, becomes very red or orange when the fish are spawning.[citation needed]
    Typical lengths of the brook trout vary from 25 to 65 cm (9.8 to 25.6 in), and weights from 0.3 to 3 kg (0.66 to 6.61 lb). The maximum recorded length is 86 cm (34 in) and maximum weight 6.6 kg (15 lb). Brook trout can reach at least seven years of age, with reports of 15-year-old specimens observed in California habitats to which the species has been introduced. Growth rates are dependent on season, age, water and ambient air temperatures, and flow rates. In general, flow rates affect the rate of change in the relationship between temperature and growth rate. For example, in spring, growth increased with temperature at a faster rate with high flow rates than with low flow rates.[13]

    Range and habitat[edit]


    U.S. native and introduced ranges of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)[14]


    Native Appalachian brook trout

    Brook trout are native to a wide area of Eastern North America, but are increasingly confined to higher elevations southward in the Appalachian Mountains to northern Georgia and northwest South Carolina, Canada from the Hudson Bay basin east, the Great Lakes–Saint Lawrence system, the Canadian maritime provinces, and the upper Mississippi River drainage as far west as eastern Iowa.[6] Their southern historic native range has been drastically reduced, with fish being restricted to higher-elevation, remote streams due to habitat loss and introductions of brown and rainbow trout. As early as 1850, the brook trout's range started to extend west from its native range through introductions. The brook trout was eventually introduced into suitable habitats throughout the western U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries at the behest of the American Acclimatization Society and by private, state, and federal fisheries authorities.[15] Acclimatization movements in Europe, South America, and Oceania resulted in brook trout introductions throughout Europe,[12] in Argentina[16] and New Zealand.[17] Although not all introductions were successful, a great many established wild, self-sustaining populations of brook trout in non-native waters.

    Habitat[edit]


    Typical southern Appalachian brook trout habitat

    The brook trout inhabits large and small lakes, rivers, streams, creeks, and spring ponds. They prefer clear waters of high purity and a narrow pH range and are sensitive to poor oxygenation, pollution, and changes in pH caused by environmental effects such as acid rain. The typical pH range of brook trout waters is 5.0 to 7.5, with pH extremes of 3.5 to 9.8 possible.[18] Water temperatures typically range from 34 to 72 °F (1 to 22 °C). Warm summer temperatures and low flow rates are stressful on brook trout populations—especially larger fish.[19]

    Coasters[edit]

    A potamodromous population of brook trout native to Lake Superior, which migrate into tributary rivers to spawn, are called "coasters".[20] Coasters tend to be larger than most other populations of brook trout, often reaching 6 to 7 lb (2.7 to 3.2 kg) in size.[21] Many coaster populations have been severely reduced by overfishing and habitat loss by the construction of hydroelectric power dams on Lake Superior tributaries. In Ontario and Michigan, efforts are underway to restore and recover coaster populations.[22]

    Salters[edit]

    When Europeans first settled Eastern North America, semianadromous or sea-run brook trout, commonly called "salters", ranged from southern New Jersey, north throughout the Canadian maritime provinces, and west to Hudson Bay. Salters may spend up to three months at sea feeding on crustaceans, fish, and marine worms in the spring, not straying more than a few miles from the river mouth. The fish return to freshwater tributaries to spawn in the late summer or autumn. While in salt water, salters gain a more silvery color, losing much of the distinctive markings seen in freshwater. However, within two weeks of returning to fresh water, they assume typical brook trout color and markings.[21]
  8. 01-19-2017, 08:47 PM

    Accepted
    Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout Fishing Starts at 4:00 of the video

    Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout Is Hooked at 4:09 of the video

    PlayStation 4 - Final Fantasy XV - Heaviest Fish Caught - Callatein Brook Trout - 7.1 lbs Landed at 5:08 of the video & Final Fish Weight is at 5:19-22 of the Video

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