PC Engine - PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge - 669,250 - Ryan Genno

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  1. PC Engine - PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge - 669,250 - Ryan Genno

    07-06-2017, 01:11 PM
    vzaar-player


    Bonk's Revenge
    Score Track
    https://www.twingalaxies.com/scores.php?scores=208754
    Rules
    Specific Rule Set: You can pick any mode. No Continues.
    Submission Message
    My memory card ran out at the end.
  2. 07-09-2017, 07:57 PM



  3. 07-09-2017, 08:00 PM
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_PC_Engine_games
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PC_Engine_SuperGrafx

    The PC Engine SuperGrafx (PCエンジンスーパーグラフィックス Pī Shī Enjin SūpāGurafikkusu), also shortened as the SuperGrafx or PC Engine SG, is a video game console by NEC Home Electronics, released exclusively in Japan. It is an upgraded version of the PC Engine, released two years prior. Like the PC Engine, the SuperGrafx was also imported and sold in France.
    Originally announced as the PC Engine 2 (PCエンジン2 Pī Shī Enjin Tsū),[2] the machine was purported to be a true 16-bit system with improved graphics and audio capabilities over the original PC Engine. Expected to be released in 1990, the SuperGrafx was rushed to market, debuting several months earlier in late 1989 with only modest improvements over the original PC Engine.
    Only seven games were produced which took advantage of the improved SuperGrafx hardware,[3] and two of those could be played on a regular PC Engine. However, the SuperGrafx is backwards compatible with all PC Engine software in both, HuCard and CD-ROM² format, bringing the compatible software total up to nearly 700. The system was not widely adopted and is largely seen as a commercial failure.

    Hardware[edit]

    Compared to the PC Engine, the SuperGrafx has four times the amount of working RAM for the main CPU and a second video chip with its own video RAM. Also included is a priority controller chip, which allows the output of both video chips to be combined in various ways[citation needed]. The SuperGrafx has support for two independently scrolling background layers, like the Mega Drive, as opposed to the PC Engine's single layer.
    It is a very common misconception[4] that the extra video hardware capabilities were taxing on the system's CPU, and is often cited as the main reason few games were developed for the system. In reality, despite having the same CPU as the PC Engine, the SuperGrafx is more than capable of keeping up with the new graphics enhancements, as the majority of the workload is handled by the VDPs.

    SuperGrafx with Super CD Rom²

    One accessory of note was the "Power Console", designed to add a full flight yoke, throttle and keypad to the SuperGrafx, sliding over the entire console. Besides a prototype, no Power Consoles were ever produced.
    Since the SuperGrafx was produced and marketed as an upgraded PC Engine model rather than as a new platform, it was backwards compatible with standard PC Engine HuCards in addition to its own. However, SuperGrafx-specific HuCards were expensive compared to standard HuCards, in some cases approaching as much as $110 USD at retail.
    The SuperGrafx is also compatible with the CD-ROM² System add-on (via the ROM² Adaptor), as well as the Super CD-ROM² add-on. No CD-ROM² format games were produced that took advantage of the SuperGrafx's added capabilities.

    Technical specifications[edit]



    This section is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this section to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (September 2016)

    • CPU: 8-bit HuC6280A, a modified 65SC02 running at 1.79, or 7.16 MHz (switchable by software). Features integrated bankswitching hardware (driving a 21-bit external address bus from a 6502-compatible 16-bit address bus), an integrated general-purpose I/O port, a timer, block transfer instructions, and dedicated move instructions for communicating with the HuC6270A VDC.
    • GPU: A multiple graphics processor setup. One 16-bit HuC6260 Video Color Encoder (VCE), two 16-bit HuC6270A Video Display Controllers (VDCs), and one HuC6202 Video Priority Controller. The HuC6270A featured Port-based I/O similar to the TMS99xx VDP family.

    Display[edit]

    • Resolution
      • X (Horizontal) Resolution: variable, maximum of 565 (programmable to 282, 377 or 565 pixels, or as 5.37mhz, 7.159mhz, and 10.76mhz pixel dot clock)[5] Taking into consideration overscan limitations of CRT televisions at the time, the horizontal resolutions were realistically limited to something a bit less than what the system was actually capable of. Consequently, most game developers limited their games to either 256, 336, or 512 pixels in display width for each of the three modes.[6]
      • Y (Vertical) Resolution: variable, maximum of 242 (programmable in increments of 1 scanline)

    • Color
      • Depth: 9-bit
      • Colors available: 512
      • Colors onscreen: 482 (241 background, 241 sprite)
      • Palettes: 32 (16 for background tiles, 16 for sprites)
      • Colors per palette: 16

    • Sprites
      • Simultaneously displayable: 128
      • Sizes: 16×16, 16×32, 16×64, 32×16, 32×32, 32×64
      • Palette: Each sprite can use up to 15 unique colors (one color must be reserved as transparent) via one of the 16 available sprite palettes.
      • Layers: The dual HuC6270A VDCs are capable of displaying 2 sprite layers (1 each). Sprites could be placed either in front of or behind background tiles. Each layer can display 16 sprites or 256 sprite pixels per scanline, giving the combined sprite per scanline limit of 32 sprites or 512 sprite pixels.

    • Tiles
      • Size: 8×8
      • Palette: Each background tile can use up to 16 unique colors via one of the 16 available background palettes. The first color entry of each background palette must be the same across all background palettes.
      • Layers: The dual HuC6270A VDCs were capable of displaying 2 background layers (1 each).

    Memory[edit]

    • Work RAM: 32KB
    • Video RAM: 128KB (64KB per HuC6270A VDC)

    Audio capacity[edit]

    • Six Wavetable Synthesis audio channels, programmable through the HuC6280A CPU.
    • Each channel had a frequency of 111.87 kHz for single cycle of 32 samples (while not in D/A mode) with a bit depth of 5 bits. Each channel also was allotted 20 bytes (32×5 bits) of RAM for sample data.
    • The waveforms were programmable so the composers were not limited to the standard selection of waveforms (square, sine, sawtooth, triangle, etc.). But the use of standard waveforms, and semi-standard forms, such as a 25% pulse wave were used fairly often.
    • The first two audio channels (1 and 2) were capable of LFO when channel #2 was used to modulate channel #1. In theory, this could also be used to perform an FM operation, though due to other limitations, this was never done (note: LFO, like FM works by modifying an audible waveform (carrier oscillator) with an inaudible waveform (modulator oscillator), but LFO's modulator is subsonic rather than sonic (FM), so LFO will not change the carrier's timbre, just its behavior, and as a result, LFO does not really sound anything like FM.)
    • The final two audio channels (5 and 6) were capable of Noise generation.
    • Optional software enabled Direct D/A which allows for sampled sound to be streamed into any of the six PSG audio channels. When a channel is in D/A mode the frequency is as fast as the CPU can stream bytes to the port, though in practicality it is limited to 6.99 kHz when using the TIMER interrupt with its smallest loop setting (1023 cpu cycles) or 15.7 kHz using the scanline interrupt.
    • There is a method that combines two channels in DDA mode to play back 8-bit, 9-bit, or 10-bit samples.
    • The addition of the CD-ROM peripheral adds CD-DA sound, and a single ADPCM channel to the existing sound capabilities of the PC Engine.

    Software media[edit]

    • HuCard: A thin, card-like game media that served as the PC Engine's proprietary software storage format. The SuperGrafx was backwards compatible with all legacy HuCards in addition to its own. The labels on SuperGrafx HuCards were upside-down relative to standard HuCards; A standard HuCard will read upside down on a SuperGrafx, while its own are right-side-up.
    • CD-ROM²: The SuperGrafx is compatible with all CD-ROM² System titles, including Super CD-ROM² and Arcade CD-ROM², provided the console is connected to a CD-ROM drive add-on and has the required System Card. No CD-ROM² games were produced specifically for the SuperGrafx.

    Input/Output[edit]

    • HuCard cartridge connector.
    • EXT-BUS expansion connector. (for Super CD-ROM², Tennokoe 2, RAU-30, etc.)
    • Standard mini-DIN gamepad connector.
    • Enhanced I/O port with 8 output and 4 input pins for the unreleased Power Console peripheral.
    • 5-pin DIN A/V connector with composite video and stereo audio output only.
    • Power adapter jack.
    • Compatibility mode (PC-Engine or SuperGrafx) switch on back of unit.

    Peripherals[edit]

    • ROM² Adaptor (RAU-30) - An adapter released in Japan on April 20, 1990[7] that allows the SuperGrafx unit to be connected into CD-ROM² System's Interface Unit. This was not required for the later Super CD-ROM² System add-on.
    • Power Console (PI-PD7)[8] - An unreleased cockpit-sized controller that attaches onto the SuperGraph unit itself, connecting via the expansion port on the front side. The peripheral would've added numerous control options such as an eight-way joystick, four action buttons, a flight yoke with two triggers (one on each handle), a throttle lever, a jog dial, three mode switches, an LCD panel, an LED indicator, four additional controller ports and a numerical keypad. The Power Console was scheduled to be released in Spring 1990 with a suggested retail price of 59,800 yen, but was never released due to its high production cost and the poor sales of the SuperGrafx itself.[9][10]

    The SuperGrafx is compatible with all standard PC Engine input devices, such as the TurboPad and the Multitap.

    Software catalog[edit]

    Platform specific[edit]

    All SuperGrafx releases were on the HuCard format.


    Forward compatible (PC-SG)[edit]

    These HuCards were designed to take advantage of the PC Engine SuperGrafx's enhanced capabilities, but were otherwise forward compatible with standard PC Engine consoles. They featured the PC-SG mark on them.

    Unreleased[edit]



    PC Engine SuperGrafx
    PC Engine SuperGrafx system

    Manufacturer
    NEC Home Electronics
    Type
    Video game console
    Generation
    Fourth generation
    Release date



    Media
    HuCard, CD-ROM
    CPU
    Hudson Soft HuC6280
    Best-selling game
    Daimakaimura[citation needed]
    Predecessor
    PC Engine (main system)
    Successor
    PC Engine Duo (updated syste
  4. 07-14-2017, 09:37 AM
    A OK ACCEPTED Vote YES

    Note to Twin Galaxy MembersVideo Cuts Off Score to that Point is 669,250
    with 14 Lives Left a Million Plus Points for Sure All Good A OK ACCEPTED Vote YES


    Extra Men at 20,000,60,000,
    110,000 160,000,210,000,260,000,310,000,360,000,410,000.46 0,000,510,000,560,000,610,000
    Every 50,000 Points After 60,000 You Get Extra Man


    Bottom Right Corner of the Game Screen you Can See Heads Represent Lives & Top Left Corner of the Game Screen 3 Hearts Represent Health



    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 3 Lives Can Be Seen & Game Starts at 1:32 of the video Bottom Right Corner of the Game Screen you Can See Heads Represent Lives & Top Left Corner of the Game Screen 3 Hearts Represent HealthAttachment 33609

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 20,000 Can Be Seen at 6:09 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 20,100Attachment 33610

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 60,000 Can Be Seen at 15:17 of the video Bottom Left Corner Score 60,100Attachment 33611

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP at 16:22 of the video Score 62,300 Bottom Right CornerAttachment 33612

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 110,000 Can Be Seen at 22:08 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 110,150Attachment 33613

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP 25:39 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 124,100
    Name:  2017_07_14_16_25_128.png
Views: 153
Size:  1.83 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 4 Extra Men 160,000,210,000, 260,000,310,000 Every 50,000 Points You Get Extra Man Can Be Seen from 27:44 to of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 126,700 to 316,700 for 4 Extra Men

    Name:  2017_07_14_16_35_0510.png
Views: 161
Size:  1.89 MB


    Name:  2017_07_14_16_30_449.png
Views: 418
Size:  1.91 MB
    Score after Bonus Points Awarded is 356,700 11 Lives Can Be Seen at 28:00 of the video Bottom Right CornerName:  2017_07_14_16_50_3111.png
Views: 221
Size:  1.91 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP Can Be Seen at 28:32 of the video Score is 356,700Name:  2017_07_14_16_55_2212.png
Views: 316
Size:  990.0 KB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 360,000 Can Be Seen at 30:04 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 360,000Name:  2017_07_14_16_57_5713.png
Views: 269
Size:  713.7 KB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP 34:23 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 391,050Name:  2017_07_14_17_03_3114.png
Views: 148
Size:  1.83 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP at 36:56 of the video Score 397,200Name:  2017_07_14_17_09_0315.png
Views: 479
Size:  1.13 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 410,000 38:04 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 415,400Name:  2017_07_14_17_11_3016.png
Views: 149
Size:  1.74 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP at 45:46 of the Video Bottom Right Corner Score 435,050Name:  2017_07_14_17_14_5017.png
Views: 305
Size:  1.76 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra 460,000 Can Be Seen at 55:45 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 460,200 Name:  2017_07_14_17_17_2318.png
Views: 150
Size:  917.9 KB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man 510,000 Can Be Seen at 1:02:13 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 510,050Name:  2017_07_14_17_20_5819.png
Views: 204
Size:  813.7 KB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 560,000 1:09:45 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 566,900Name:  2017_07_14_17_26_0720.png
Views: 158
Size:  831.0 KB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge Extra Man at 610,000 Can Be Seen at 1:18:04 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 612,550Name:  2017_07_14_17_30_3721.png
Views: 244
Size:  1.13 MB

    PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge 1UP is at 1:21:55 of the video Bottom Right Corner Score 652,450Name:  2017_07_14_17_35_0022.png
Views: 211
Size:  1.05 MB


    PC Engine - PC Genjin 2 - Bonk's Revenge - 669,250 Final Score is at 1:32:40 of the video

    Video Cuts Off Score to that Point is 669,250
    with 14 Lives Left a Million Plus Points for Sure All Good A OK ACCEPTED Vote YES
    Name:  2017_07_14_16_21_477.png
Views: 136
Size:  1.55 MB





















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    Made by Raw Thrills & Owned By Eugene Jarvis Vid Kidz Williams,Midway & Creator of Cruisin Series & Defender Many More.

    Submission Points 12,564 + 60 for Sponsor = 12,624


    I JJT Johnny Correctly Adjudicated 12,624 .97762920815%


    Adjudicated Video Game Submissions I JJT Johnny Got Wrong a Total of 30 in Twin Galaxy's Adjudication Archives Accepted, Rejected & Cancel Archives
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  5. 07-14-2017, 09:40 AM
    Bonk's Revenge (PC-原人 2, or PC-Genjin 2 in Japan) is a 2D platformer set in prehistory, originally for the TurboGrafx 16 console, created in 1991 by the Red Company for Hudson and Turbo Technologies, and licensed by NEC. This is the second title in the Bonk series and it was re-released for the TurboGrafx-16 in 1992 on the Gate of Thunder 4-in-1 game CD-ROM. A completely different game with the same name appeared on the Game Boy, whereas the original version was re-released for Wii Virtual Console and on the Japanese PlayStation Store. It was also released in Japan on Windows Store[1] on December 13, 2013 and on Wii U Virtual Console on March 12, 2014.

    Gameplay[edit]

    This time, the titular large-headed caveman is on a quest to recover half of the moon, which was stolen by the evil King Drool III. Its multiple stages each contain several specific areas, which range from outdoors to trains to space to underwater. As in most platformers, Bonk has several crucial abilities: the I button causes him to jump; the II button causes him to "bonk," an action in which Bonk slams his head forward, inflicting a killing blow on most enemies; I jump-II combo causes Bonk to head-butt the Earth, killing enemies he lands on and creating a damaging shock wave; Holding down the II button in midair causes Bonk to spin and hover, allowing for long, controlled jumps. Bonk can also use his large mouth to grip onto allowed surfaces for climbing.
    Bonk's health is reflected in heart containers, similar to games in the Zelda series. Taking damage will cause Bonk to lose a certain amount of hearts, and hearts can be refilled through items, such as fruit, collected throughout the game. Bonk can also attain blue hearts that increase his amount of hearts, allowing him to effectively gain more health as the game progresses. The game also features Smileys, similar to coins in the Mario series, which are helpful when you get to the bonus round after each boss because you can get extra lives. Bonk can also turn invincible when he collects a large meat or two small meats, and can gain an extra life when he collects a small model of himself.

    Power-up forms[edit]

    Bonk is able to power-up and change into various forms by eating meat. With one small piece of meat, when he Bonks, a cloud floats towards enemies, freezing them when they come in contact. When he spins in the air, he has a cloud surrounding him. When he lands on his head, it freezes all enemies onscreen. With an additional small piece or one large piece, he becomes fully powered up and becomes temporarily invincible . In this form, he breathes fire, which destroys any enemies that comes into contact with it. When spinning, he is surrounded by fire, & when he lands, it causes damage to all enemies, & instantly destroys most, but not all of them onscreen.

    Variations in gameplay[edit]

    In the Game Boy version of this title, Bonk can turn into one of three unique heroes: Master Bonk, Hungry Bonk, or Stealth Bonk. Becoming Master Bonk dresses Bonk in a cape and provides him with Vulcan-esque ears, and gives him the ability to move faster and jump higher. Becoming Hungry Bonk gives Bonk an animalistic appearance with evil eyes and a mouth full of razor-sharp teeth, and gives Bonk the ability to chew enemies to death, as well as providing him with a much stronger head-butt that can kill nearby foes. Becoming Stealth Bonk dresses Bonk in a striped jail outfit, and gives him the ability to enter special locked doors that lead to areas such as the bank, where Bonk can collect Smileys, the butcher's, where Bonk can eat more slabs of meat in hope for a different power-up, and jail, where Bonk loses a portion of his Smileys.
    Grabbing one of many tulips scattered throughout the game carries Bonk to a special bonus stage where he can face off against Mechabonk -- a RoboCop-esque version of Bonk—in a best-of-three battle to "bonk" one another off the edge of a small stage. Winning two rounds provides Bonk with an extra life, while a loss transforms Bonk into Wounded Bonk, where Bonk resembles a mummy and takes twice as much damage as usual.
    The game overall is very similar to games in the Mario series, providing linear, side-scrolling action, multiple power-ups, and several small boss confrontations leading up to a final boss. Its treatment of power-ups is similar as well: taking a hit while powered-up causes Bonk to take no damage but instead lose his power. For those who struggle with the game, the game offers passwords after game-overs so the player does not need to start over from the beginning.
    Bonk's Revenge
    North American TurboGrafx-16 cover

    Developer(s)
    Red Company
    Publisher(s)
    Hudson Soft
    NEC Home Electronics
    Composer(s)
    Hirohiko Takayama
    Series
    Bonk
    Platform(s)
    TurboGrafx-16, Game Boy, Virtual Console, PlayStation Network, Windows Store[1]
    Release
    1991
    Genre(s)
    2D side scrolling platform game
    Mode(s)
    Single-player
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  6. 07-17-2017, 09:00 AM
    Name:  pic 009.JPG
Views: 121
Size:  434.1 KB
    Here's a pic of the card, baby!
    -Ohya, baby! I'm the first ever dude on the planet to get a documented PERFECT score on Bonk's Adventure!
    I also have a high score on Alfred Chicken.... yeah, not as good.
    http://videogames101.com
    or http://www.youtube.com/user/starsoldier1
  7. 07-27-2017, 10:50 AM
    Expert Mode selected at 1:25.
    -Ohya, baby! I'm the first ever dude on the planet to get a documented PERFECT score on Bonk's Adventure!
    I also have a high score on Alfred Chicken.... yeah, not as good.
    http://videogames101.com
    or http://www.youtube.com/user/starsoldier1
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