Personal Information Required to Submit Scores?

  1. 02-08-2020, 06:03 AM
    I bought the Guinness Gamers Edition 2020 (out of habit of buying the series than actual interest) and read a few pages: I cannot relate to those gamers. I understand it doesn't diminish the achievements listed but anyone can go around pretending to be one of those gamers in wide society (not that wide society particular cares). At least when I appeared in the book it was by name & I carry identification to prove that much in my tales*

    * Of lack-lustre performances that nobody cares about... but people make passing comment of "oh, which game" and then loose interest. :P
    I'd rather be last on every game than throw my time away chasing only one score.
  2. 02-08-2020, 09:13 AM
    I'm really beginning to feel this is highlighting a clear "generational divide".

    TG score hunters are older, seeing arcade and Atari as the most significant scores. Playing using portable recording devices to record. It's about real names as that's the only identity that's ever been part of their life. "Online" is a thing that came later in life.

    Speedrunners are younger, and being online and known by online aliases is just a thing that's always been there. Video games have always been around, and have always had stories and could be beaten. NES is the "old school" system, stuff before that is just too old. Streaming and watching others stream is the way of things.

    That's really the way I'm starting to find makes sense of this discussion.

    I'm sure there are too many variables to be able to draw a conclusion specifically, but it seems hard to say using aliases is any sort of negative on a community, given that AGDQ this year raised over $3 million in charity, had over 14 million hours of viewing, and topped 250k max viewership during the event. SRC is far, far more active than here. YouTube is full of speedrunning content. It's a thriving community, all based on online aliases.
    Join the UNOFFICIAL Twin Galaxies Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/7PfNNDk
  3. 02-08-2020, 03:32 PM
    There is no doubt that speed runners are of a clearly different mindset. Keep in mind the differences between the two types of gamers...

    -> Speed runners (while performing speed runs) care more about fastest finishes than the fact that 90% of more of the game's programming is not utilized within their run

    -> Speed runners (again) have no problem with glitches including major ones...and although the "uber glitches" might warrant their own special record keeping variations within that community, they compete on them nonetheless

    -> On average, have you ever heard of a speed runner talking about a NON-"speed" completion of any title...ever ?

    -> Speed runners generally know each other by "nickname" or "gaming alias" and rarely know of non-speed-runners save for a select few

    Now, the above is generally the polar opposite for non-speed runners. But it's not a "generation" gap. Penetration into each community by members of the "other" community is rare, but it happens.

    Even so-called "X-Gamers" from extreme sports go by real names as opposed to "nicknames", and generally these participants are of a much younger age than today's classic gaming community and non-speed runners. Also, young aspiring Olympians and athletes compete with their real-names on both a professional and amateur level.

    So it would seem that the speed running community is somewhat unique even when compared to other competitive environments and competitors of a younger generation.

    I checked the history of the speed running community and it seems to have generally originated back in the 1993-1994 range when some competitors started to "speed run" titles of that era such as the "Doom" series. I noticed that these gamers tended to have a "nickname" within their own name every time they appeared in print or were referenced in an interview such as (ex) Edward "Fast Eddie" Smith. It somehow added to their notoriety at the time and that mindset stuck around even when the originator of the speed demo archives and community built that site for like-minded participants.

    That mindset continued for awhile until such a time when it became more of the norm to leave off the real name part and just mention the nickname or "gaming alias". Whether that decision was made by those who ran the community on a go-foward basis or whether it slowly phased in over a few years is hard to say for sure as nothing I could find would support either position. My gut tells me that it was a gradual phasing over a relatively short while as once the ball gets rolling it seldom stops when it comes to being cutting edge or merely to be different.

    If you were to poll today's speed runners, and isolate them into two groups...1993-1997 speed runners and 1998-present speed runners I am sure that the older members remember when they routinely used both their full name and nickname or "gaming alias" back in the day. That group would collectively be able to provide the most accurate assessment of why such a transition ever took place.

    The more modern speed runners most likely went with the flow as by that point the "norm" in that community was to eschew real names.

    There's nothing wrong with what they do, but it would be nice to actually know the why behind it, and the modern-era speed-runners likely have a much different idea as to "why" then their predecessors. I would place more faith and acceptance in the explanation as to the "why" behind it as coming from those who lined the early days of the community as opposed to those who are merely following the herd in the here and now.
  4. 02-08-2020, 03:53 PM
    The eSports community is an entirely different animal as even on a team level the team name itself is fully a "gaming alias" by default.

    I'm not going to get into the "who founded eSports" discussion especially as I know QUITE sure that a certain someone was NOT the "father of eSports" just as Al Gore did NOT invent the internet, so enough said on that.

    These players operate on an entirely different level than speed runners. They have corporate and business sponsors and they operate as a team as opposed to individually, plus they compete for money. Big money.

    Although in physical sports the pro teams (MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL, NASCAR, etc) continue to promote players by their real names, eSports is different as it caters to a much younger demographic, and I do believe that today's modern-era eSports fans care to have to remember (never mind spell) player names such as "Giannis Antetokounmpo", "Jarrod Saltalamacchia" or "Erisbel Arruebarrena" just to name a few real-life physical sports players from within the past decade.

    There is a definite attention-span issue as well when it comes to "millennials", and while gamers tend to have razor sharp, "millennials" often do not as their focus is quite literally all over the place racing from their hand-held device to a conversation, then to what's actually in front of them, etc.

    Bottom line is that "Big Business" probably finds it easier to promote unique and catchy nicknames and "gaming aliases" than hard-to-spell or generic real names if given the chance. They are pretty much locked into doing so for pre-existing major league physical pro sports organizations, but they have (and had) the opportunity to set the tone from square one with respect to the developing eSports business as a whole.

    But this mindset to equate and relate because a generation's preference is clearly related to just gaming because modern-era actors and actresses still go by their real names (or chosen stage names) as opposed to a nickname or "acting alias". There ARE some notable exceptions such as Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson" who is interchangeably known by both his real name and his WWF(WWE) personae name but these are the exceptions.
  5. 02-08-2020, 04:00 PM
    i remember reading history of chess grandmasters. one great (sorry dont remmber the name i read it casually) was also a medical doctor. He feared being famous a game player would make people think less of him as a doctor. sounds weird as chess is an intelligent game, but think of how many people think you cant be both strong and smart, or attractive and smart, or really anything and smart.

    theres absolutley reason why even if you ignore the rudy's of the world and dildos sent to you in the mail over a video game spat to not want people knowing. I have no doubt there are some customers who wouldnt want their taxes done by someone who was a super mario bros champ, somehow thinking you cant possibly be both good at taxes and smb. I'm sure if a trial lawyer were to get the record in metroid some clients would feel awkard going to her and the record would harm business

    dont underestimate the prejudice that can go with even seemingly good or neutral things. theres absolutely reasons for people to want to keep their brands seperate.
    If you have enjoyed this comment please consider clicking the "like" button
  6. 02-08-2020, 04:14 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    dont underestimate the prejudice that can go with even seemingly good or neutral things. theres absolutely reasons for people to want to keep their brands seperate


    RTM REPLY - Rudy Ferretti aside...and who am I kidding, Roy Shildt and Scott Stilphen as well...I've never had any problems in gaming dating back to "Phase 2" of TG (1996-1997) which was approx 25 years ago.

    I have no "brand" myself, but the fact that some modern-era players seem to thrive on "their brand" such as that "Ninja" fellow, or "Fatal1ty", etc, that's an entirely separate mindset and consideration which did not exist before social media ballooned within the past generation.

    And I can also see another reason why hiding behind a nickname, "gaming alias" or "brand" might be helpful"...all I'll say is MIssQGemini" as this poor dope epitomizes the usefulness of hiding behind an nickname or "gaming alias". If the sh*t hits the fan she can get off social media and in a year or two "re-invent" herself under some other nickname or "gaming alias". But that's the exception and not the norm.
  7. 02-09-2020, 06:57 AM
    Here's a good example in competition where you just can't take it seriously when nicknames are involved.

    In this Texas Hold'em video, the alcohol-swigging "Mamacita", "Big Al" and "Denis the Menace" are among this table of competitors.

    World Series Poker this is not, both in terms of poker skills and the players themselves...it's like a poor man's poker tour...or better yet, backyard wrestling vs the WWF/WWE.

  8. 02-09-2020, 01:27 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by RTM View Post
    There is no doubt that speed runners are of a clearly different mindset. Keep in mind the differences between the two types of gamers...

    -> Speed runners (while performing speed runs) care more about fastest finishes than the fact that 90% of more of the game's programming is not utilized within their run

    -> Speed runners (again) have no problem with glitches including major ones...and although the "uber glitches" might warrant their own special record keeping variations within that community, they compete on them nonetheless

    -> On average, have you ever heard of a speed runner talking about a NON-"speed" completion of any title...ever ?

    -> Speed runners generally know each other by "nickname" or "gaming alias" and rarely know of non-speed-runners save for a select few

    Now, the above is generally the polar opposite for non-speed runners. But it's not a "generation" gap. Penetration into each community by members of the "other" community is rare, but it happens.

    Even so-called "X-Gamers" from extreme sports go by real names as opposed to "nicknames", and generally these participants are of a much younger age than today's classic gaming community and non-speed runners. Also, young aspiring Olympians and athletes compete with their real-names on both a professional and amateur level.

    So it would seem that the speed running community is somewhat unique even when compared to other competitive environments and competitors of a younger generation.
    Wow, it sounds like you're still bitter about the success of speedrunning, and I can feel the disdain you have for the way they play games.

    Never mind the fact that 100% runs are often just as popular any any% runs, or that glitchless is very much a thing. You're upset that you don't think they play the game "properly". Even though many of those glitches abused were found through careful inspection of the code, watching the memory values, using debuggers to understand the game's internals so they can know how to trigger events early, or jump into "parallel universes" in Mario 64, or force values into memory in Ocarina of Time to manipulate the objects they get, or to reprogram the game on the fly so that Super Mario World can turn allow a player to edit a level and play it in real time on a console...

    If only you could appreciate just how much speedrunning is a love letter to gaming. A level of mastery that we should all appreciate, encourage, and embrace.
    Join the UNOFFICIAL Twin Galaxies Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/7PfNNDk
    Likes Snowflake liked this post
  9. 02-09-2020, 03:00 PM
    i would add that though i agree with the main point of the cultures being different, how often it is one group over simplificies the other gruop

    speedrunners missing large portions of the game for example. this is only true on the surface. in order to know which areas to skip require far more analysis than point runners often do. further, the portions that are done also require knowing fine details about the game that point runners can miss. Speed runners skip large surface things that everyone can see, point runners skip things that they dont even know exist.

    i was very impresed with how much detail a speedrun can require that goes missed with point running. think marathons. for a marathon you can use an inferior tactic as long as its good enough, and just stay awake longer to make up for the issues. you can substitute stamina for skill. in a speed run you absolutley must maximize every single tool at your disposal

    the issue with many complex things, speedruns included, is sometime they're so complex others cant even see the complexiity and so think they're simple. Its sad the most intellectual things of all get dismissed as stupid simply because people arent smart enough to see the intellectualism invovled.
    If you have enjoyed this comment please consider clicking the "like" button
    Likes GibGirl liked this post
  10. 02-09-2020, 03:08 PM
    oh and in my comparison of marathon in speed run above i wasnt crapping on marathon just pointing out differences. thats theres very much skills in speedrun that require knowing more about the game than point runners learn. marathoners also absolutely suffer from people not realizing how much goes into it and its more than "just staying awake". theres skill around finding tactics that allow for breaks. determining which non safe zones will allow you to work away the longest with minimal death. even the endurace isnt simply "stay awake" but rather skills invovled with physical endurance, which granted isnt game skills, but it is a skill none the less to know how to train your body and use it

    long story short, is when you think another field is missing a lot, odds are its actually so complex and involves so much that you're not even capable of seeing the complexitiies invovled and so dismiss them as simple. this is a general issue with humans that goes far beyond video games. assuming whatever they cant understand is stupid, ironically making the most complext things of all get dismissed as the simplest
    If you have enjoyed this comment please consider clicking the "like" button
    Likes GibGirl liked this post
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 47
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Join us